My Interest In Instruments

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My interest in instruments goes back a long ways. My parents bought me my first guitar when I was eight – and I’m 61 now! INTERESTINGLY, THE GUITAR WAS MADE IN EAST GERMANY… STRANGE THING FOR THE TIMES. BTW, I still have that guitar – THAT’S IT PICTURED ABOVE. and, it’s as hard to play now as when it was brand new. For an eight year old, a classical guitar with a 2″ nut and a dead flat fret board – combined with a chunky neck – made for quite the stretch! Truth-be-told, it also made me work at it, and I’m sure I’m a better player now for it. 
My first “good guitar” came in the mid 1970’s. I found an ad for a “Grammer Guitar” and thought it looked interesting. It turned out that I had (unknowingly) bought a collectable guitar… which I didn’t realize for quite some time.  Shortly after getting that one, I found an even better Grammer – and it was a 12 string model – way cool! I played both of those quite a bit. The 12 string  was eventually sold to pay for our honeymoon… but that’s a whole different story.  Not realizing the value of the 6 string ( a very loud dreadnaught with Brazilian Rosewood back and sides) I did horrible things to it… Like leaving it in the back of an unheated (but covered) pickup truck – in the dead of winter – up-north. Or conversely, leaving it in the back of that same truck – but in 90 degree plus heat – while driving around the mountains down south.  Actually if was kinda’ good not knowing much about the value of it, as I had a wonderful time playing it with full abandon anywhere / anytime / any place.
Back in the late 1990’s and the early 2000’s I was buying / selling / trading instruments fairly often. As a result, I spent quite a bit of time learning how to give a used instrument a nice “once-over”. Not anything that would hurt the re-sale value. Instead, I dealt with cleaning years of accumulated “gunk” from fret-boards, fixing loose tuners, repairing loose “electrics”, re-stringing and the like. From there I started to get into a little set-up work and the occasional repair. That was fun while it lasted, and I learned a lot during those days. Mostly through “hands-on” experience.
As someone who likes to read and do research, however, my desire to learn and develop the right skills to do quality work (OK, “semi-quality” might be more accurate) pushed me further.I soon had a pretty good library of resource material to draw from.

Good enough for Charlie Brown, good enough for me! 

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will@goodworksinstruments.com

NOTE: THIS PAGE (LIKE ME) IS STILL A WORK IN PROGRESS….PLEASE CHECK BACK SOON!